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Race for Results: Spotlight on American Indian Children

The Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children is the Annie E. Casey foundation’s 2017 report on the well-being of children of color and children from immigrant families. The data measures 12 indicators and produces an index score to explain racial and ethnic disparities among children.

Nebraska is home to 4,774 American Indian Children. While American Indian Children have the third highest score with an index of 398, they did not have the highest score in any of the 12 indicators. In fact, these children had the lowest scores in 4 indicators.

 

  • Children ages 3 to 5, not enrolled in nursery school, preschool, kindergarten 2013-2015: 52%. Early childhood education creates a path to higher education and assists with brain development and skill building. Children who are not enrolled in school at a young age are less likely to earn high incomes and find stable jobs as adults.
  • Teenagers, ages 15 to 19, who do not delay childbearing until adulthood 2015: 12%. When teenagers are forced into parenthood, they are less likely to be able to provide for their babies due to a lack of economic and educational resources. Babies are also more likely to be born preterm or underweight if their mothers are teens.
  • Children, ages 0 to 17, who live above 200% of poverty 2011-2015: 30%. Children from families with higher incomes score better on cognitive tests, have fewer behavior problems, are more likely to graduate high school and enroll in college, and are less likely to live in poverty as adults.
  • Young adults, ages 19 to 26, who are not in school and working 2013-2015: 37%. When young adults do not have the opportunity to take advantage of the valuable window to build their education and skills at this point in their life, either in school or through work, they are missing a crucial window learn career skills.

American Indian children in Nebraska did not have the lowest or highest score for the other 8 indicators.

  • Children, ages 0 to 17, who live in low poverty areas (poverty <20%) 2011-2015: 43%. Children living in areas of high poverty have a greater chance of being exposed to violence and crime. Neighborhoods in impoverished areas are also less likely to have economic resources for educational success
  • Babies not born at a normal birthweight 2015: 8%. When babies are born under a normal birthweight, they are more likely to die within their first year of life or experience developmental and health issues later on.
  • Children, 4th graders, who scored at or above proficient in reading 2015: *The sample size for this indicator was too small to provide a valid estimate, therefore the data was not included in the Nebraska’s American Indian children’s index*
  • Children, 8th graders who scored at or above proficient in reading 2015: *The sample size for this indicator was too small to provide a valid estimate, therefore the data was not included in the Nebraska’s American Indian children’s index*
  • Children not graduating high school on time: 24%. Earning a high school diploma can lead to more opportunities for pursuing a degree in secondary education or finding successful jobs. Increasing the number of children who graduate on time will encourage young adults to contribute to their communities.
  • Children, ages 0 to 17, who do not live in two-parent families: 62%. Children who live in single-parent households are likely to have less economic, educational, emotional resources than children living with two parents.
  • Children, ages 0 to 17, who live with a householder who does not have at least a high school degree: 9%. Living with a parent who has a high school degree is linked to having more economic resources and better education outcomes.
  • Young adults, ages 25 to 29, who have completed an associate’s degree or higher: *The sample size for this indicator was too small to provide a valid estimate, therefore the data was not included in the Nebraska’s American Indian children’s index*

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